2009 Housing Predictions Newton and Beyond

  • The Downdraft in Housing Prices 

Meanwhile, while unemployment rises, the downward spiral in housing prices is gaining momentum.

“The No.1 thing that drives housing values is incomes,” said Todd Sinai, an associate professor of real estate at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. “When incomes fall, demand for housing falls.”

The S&P/Case-Shiller Index of home prices plunged 16.6% in August from the year before, following a 16.3% drop in July. The index has fallen every month since January 2007 (See accompanying chart, “Plummeting Prices.”).

Prices were lower in all 20 of the major cities the index covers, with Phoenix and Las Vegas down nearly 31% from last year.

Nationwide home prices have fallen 20.3% since peaking in June 2006.

And the skid isn’t over.

According to Fitch Ratings Inc., U.S. home prices will fall another 8% to 10% before they show signs of stabilizing.  According to a Fitch forecast, the peak-to-trough price decline will be 30%.

And still one other reliable indicator of housing prices seems to confirm that, in many cities, home prices still have further to fall.

According to analysis by Moody’s Investors Service (MCO), Miami houses are right now priced at about 22 times annual rental income – versus an average of just 15 over the past two decades. This suggests that a home currently priced at $350,000 is actually worth only $238,600 – meaning the price would have to drop 32% to reach the fair-value point.

The Forecast for 2009: More Pain Before Any Gain

No matter what happens in the U.S. housing market, until a large inventory reduction takes place, housing prices will not stabilize.

In a recent Forbes magazine column, A. Gary Shilling, president of an economic consulting firm of the same name, said the worst is yet to come. Says Schilling: “Excess inventory, the mortal enemy of prices, now amounts to 1.8 million homes, which is a huge number relative to the net demand (new families minus departures due to deaths and moves to nursing homes) which is only 1.5 million a year.”

And one of the architects of the U.S. housing debacle – former U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan – is also downbeat: “At a minimum, stabilization of home prices is still many months in the future,” Greenspan said in an October speech.

The question that needs to be answered, then, is this: In the current atmosphere, does anyone believe we actually need homebuilders to add even one new home to the market?

Some pundits claim this may be a golden opportunity to short U.S. homebuilders. Even though they’re already down 80% from their highs, the deadly combination of skyrocketing unemployment, deflating prices and tight credit continue to spell further pain for the industry.

Short sellers would obviously look at any of the companies mentioned above. They might also consider iShares US Home Construction (ITB), the prominent exchange traded fund (ETF) for the group. However, any such move would have to be made with extreme caution.

The reason: All bets are off if the new Barack Obama Administration implements a moratorium on mortgage foreclosures. There’s also the possibility that Obama will be able to shepherd through any one or more of the proposed mortgage guarantee programs now on the table. 

Those kinds of moves could provide a boost to homebuilders and leave short sellers in the grips of an uncomfortable squeeze – just like the millions of homeowners saddled with mortgages they can no longer pay.

Advertisements

3 comments

  1. While I know that incomes are a huge driver of housing demand, I believe there is another factor (that sadly is mostly controllable) that is driving prices downward with no real end in site. That factor is banks mostly preferring to foreclose rather than work with buyers. I answer a lot of mortgage and housing questions on sites like Yahoo Answers and Blurtit and the horror stories will curl your hair. Until banks change their M.O. I’m afraid we are in for a prolonged housing depression.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s